skip to content
 
Woman with children in water

Our Research

Our group researches schistosomiasis, a Neglected Infectious Disease caused by the parasites Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium.  We use a cross-disciplinary approach to examine the socio-ecological factors that promote transmission of the parasites, and the interactions at the human host - parasite interface that result in the development of morbidity and the development of natural immunity.

We are currently working on the shores of Lake Albert in Uganda, in collaboration with public health experts, medical anthropologists, parasite biologists and immunologists, where we are researching the causes and means of control of schistosomiasis in this hotspot of S. mansoni disease and transmission (www.fibroschot.eu).

Current and recent research topics include:

  • The FibroScHot clinical trial, which aims to optimise the frequency of treatment for control of disease in transmission hotspots (www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN16994599)
  • Exploration of the underlying immuno-pathological mechanisms of liver fibrosis caused by S. mansoni infection
  • Examination of the relationship between parasite transmission and development of immunity in S. mansoni and S. haematobium infection
  • Examination of the role of human host behaviour and snail intermediate host dynamics on the infection levels of S. haematobium in Tanzanian schoolchildren.

Key publications:

Mawa PA, Kincaid-Smith J, Tukahebwa EM, Webster JP and Wilson S (2021). Schistosomiasis morbidity hotspots: roles of the human host, the parasite and their interface in the development of severe morbidity.  Frontiers Immunol 12: 635869.

Angelo T, Kinung'hi SM, Buza J, Mwanga JR, Kariuki HC, Wilson S (2019). Community knowledge, perceptions, and water contact practices associated with transmission of urinary schistosomiasis in an endemic region: a qualitative cross-sectional study.  BMC Public Health 19: 703.

Angelo T, Buza J, Kinung'hi SM, Kariuki HC, Mwanga JR, Munisi DZ, Wilson S (2018). Geographical and behavioural risks associated with Schistosoma haematobium infection in an area of complex transmission. Parasit Vectors 11:481.

 Oettle R and Wilson S (2017).  The interdependence between schistosome transmission and protective immunity.  Trop Med Infect Dis 2: 42.